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Photographing Flowers Closeup in Nature

Photographing Flowers Closeup in Nature

Taking great closeup photos of flowers requires a good macro lens. It is important to get real close to the flower. You can even get as close as taking just a part of a flower. Using selective focus and keeping only a small part in focus can result in some interesting macro shots.

 

Purple Flower in Magoebaskloof Forest

This photo was taken in December 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro.
Camera Settings: f/8.0, 1/160 seconds and ISO 2000

 

Lighting a flower when you are so close to the flower can be difficult. The lens could cast a shadow and placing a flash to light the subject is not always easy. I prefer using natural light and for flowers shade or cloudy days I think is best.

In some cases where there is not enough light a tripod could be necessary. With macro photography motion blur can easily spoil the photo. If you choose a shallow depth of field meaning a big aperture you can easily get a high enough shutter speed to hand hold the camera. A macro lens with image stabilisation is very useful in this situation.

 

Red Flowers in Magoebaskloof Forest

This photo was taken in December 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro.
Camera Settings: f/4.0, 1/160 seconds and ISO 1000

 

In some cases it can be better to shoot in manual mode and most cases manual focusing is necessary. If you use slow shutter speeds and most probably also a tripod then having a cable release can be very useful. To get the sharpest flower photo it is important to use a tripod and cable release, have mirror lockup switched on and if your macro lens has image stabilisation, turn it off. Important to note that image stabilisation must be turned off only when using a tripod.

 

Closeup of Plant in Magoebaskloof Forest

This photo was taken in December 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro.
Camera Settings: f/2.8, 1/160 seconds and ISO 1000

 

After getting the camera settings correct and the lighting all set up, consider some different angles. Move closer or further away and play around with the depth of field until you get enough good photos. If you change the angle also consider the background. It is usually preferable to have a clean out of focus background. Don’t forget to consider composition and the rule of thirds. Also consider taking photos of the leaves and any other interesting details.

 

Purple Flower in Garden

This photo was taken in September 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro.
Camera Settings: f/2.8, 1/100 seconds and ISO 200

 

I can highly recommend the Tamron SP 90mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Macro lens. It is a good macro lens and very good value for money. This Tamron lens also has a great image stabilisation or vibration reduction as Tamron calls it. This lens can also be used as a portrait lens and takes very sharp portraits.

 

Pink Flower

This photo was taken in March 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro.
Camera Settings: f/8, 1/80 seconds and ISO 1000

 

Red Flowers in the Garden

This photo was taken in April 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro.
Camera Settings: f/2.8, 1/100 seconds and ISO 125

 

Purple Flower with Black Background

This photo was taken in June 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro and using an external flash with small softbox.
Camera Settings: f/16, 1/200 seconds and ISO 200

 

Small Leaves with Shallow depth of field

This photo was taken in June 2014 with a Canon 5D MkIII and TAMRON SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD Macro.
Camera Settings: f/2.8, 1/320 seconds and ISO 800

A Few Vineyard Photos - 2014

A Few Vineyard Photos - 2014

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A Few Spiders and a Moth - Nature Closeups

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